Review Consonant Letter Sounds

SoundCards180x150       Review Letter Sounds

Objective:  Children will recognize the Consonant Capital and Lowercase (small) letters and their sounds.  (This lesson can be taught 4 times; once for each group of letter consonant sounds.   bhlft, prmnk, cdsgj, qvwyz)

Preparations:

  • Have magnet letters or other letters for matching.  (Capital and Small Letters)
  • Be prepared to listen to the Phonics By Spelling sounds to be reviewed. https://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/
  • Be prepared to use the pictures for each sound and the Sound Cards for each sound.  https://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/
  • Have cards or magnet letters with capital and small letters for matching.  (These can be made on the computer, printed on cardstock, then cut.)
  • Have books or other things to show different fonts for the letters to be reviewed.  (Can use the computer to print different fonts.)
  • Copy worksheet for the letters to be reviewed. letter review lthbf    letter review prmnk    letter review cdsgj     letter review qvwyz

Lesson:

  • Give each child one or more Sound Cards (spellings for each sound).  Play the songs for each of the sounds to be reviewed.  Have the children give you the sound card that goes with each sound.  (You can also use the pictures for each sound.  Have a child touch the spellings for each sound as you sing the songs.)
  • Use magnet letters or cards with capital and small letters to match the capitals with their small letter.  Talk about if they look more alike or if they look different.
  • Show different fonts for the letters to be reviewed.  Find different fonts in books or other reading material.
  • Make words by writing or using magnet letters.  You pick a vowel and a consonant to be reviewed.  Let children pick another consonant and see if you can make a word or just make some fun sounds.  Practice sounding out words.

Activity:

  • Show the children the worksheet.  Have them help decide which capital letters go with which small letters.
  • Give a worksheet to each child.  Have them match the letters and write their name.
  • Say what each picture is and ask what letter sound it starts with.  Review how to make the letter on your sample worksheet, and then have each child write the letter on their worksheet.   Continue until finished.
  • All worksheets need to be done with a teacher and they need to be done right.  Never use a worksheet to test the children.  Use them as a learning experience.  They are a great hands-on continuation of the lesson.
  • It is fun to have them write a simple word on the back and draw a picture, such as sad.

Long Vowel Simple Sight Words

Long Vowel Simple Sight Word Lesson: ( Free worksheets.)I (2)

Preparation:

Lesson:  Rule:  Vowels alone not followed by a consonant and at the end of a syllable, especially the first syllable, are usually long.  

  • Discuss the rule.
  • Read together all the word cards.
  • Read the story He Bear, She Bear by Stan and Jan  Berenstain.

Activity:

  • Do the worksheet/s together. Write the letter to finish the word and review the sound, combine the consonant with the long vowel and sound out the word, then draw a picture  of each word.
  • Repeat with each word.
  •  Have the children read the words to as many people as possible for their homework.

Options:

  • On the back of the worksheet have them write some other long vowel E words and draw pictures for each.  ( tree, bee, free, see, )
  • Put this sentence on the back of the worksheet.  ( See the bee in the tree.)   Have the children draw the picture for this sentence.
  • Make a simple book where they draw the pictures with these words,  He sees  _____.  She sees_____.  We see _____. I see  ______.

Mother’s Day Gift

Mother’s Day Gift  (Plan 2 or 3 days to finish.)

Lance-2

Supplies:

  • an apron (These can be found in fabric or craft stores.) 
  • fabric paint of the following colors (you can use acrylic paint with fabric medium added to it): red, yellow, orange, green, purple, brown
  • pencil

  • permanent markers of all colors,
  • iron
  • piece of cardboard

Paint the Apron

Before you begin, wash your apron to remove the sizing and help the paint adhere a bit better (but do not use fabric softener). Iron the apron.  Also read the directions on the paints that you will be using and adjust any of the painting steps to follow directions that might be different for that particular brand of paint.

Place the apron on the table with poster board or cardboard underneath. 

Start painting. Have your child do each of the following steps:

Hyacinth

  • Draw a reference line with pencil where you want the hyacinth.

  • Have the child fingerprint the flower petals on the hyacinth reloading paint as needed.

Daffodil

  • Brush a thumb with yellow paint with a paint brush.
  • Make 6 petals in a circle.  Reload the paint as needed.
  • Brush on orange paint on the thumb, then make a thumb print in the center of your daffodil.

Tulip

  • Brush on the red paint on the whole hand with a paint brush, the make a hand print for the tulip.

  • Place hand print in the spot where you want the tulip.

Finish Each Flower

  • Have child paint a stem and leaves by making a V with a straight line up from the center.
  • Have them use a finger to make the dirt with brown paint.

Let the paint dry completely for 24 hours.
Heat set the paint by pressing on each section for 20-30 seconds with the iron set on high.

Have the children write “Happy Mother’s Day” or “I Love You”, above the flowers with the permanent markers.

Oodles of Noodles

Oodles of Noodles  (2 kinds)

Fast Noodles  (Can be made with gluten-free noodles.)  Children love this.

  1. Cook 1/2 lb. curly or other noodles for half of the time on the package.
  2. Save 1/2 cup of the water and drain off the rest. Put the noodles and 1/2 c. water back in the pan.
  3. Add 1 cup of frozen petite peas, a little salt, and 1 Tablespoon chicken bouillon paste or granules.  (Better than Bouillon  is a great bouillon.)
  4. Cook on low with a lid for about 5-6 minutes, then take it off the burner and leave it for 10 or more minutes.
  5. Eat and enjoy!
  6. Fun to do when learning the OO sound like in MOON.

Homemade Noodles

  • Beat 1 egg.
  • Add: 1/2 t. salt
  • 2 T. milk.
  • Stir in 1 cup of flour.      (dough will be stiff)
  • Roll dough thin on a floured board.
  • Let rest for 30 minutes.
  • Heat to boiling:  4 cups water
  • Then add: 4 t. bouillon paste or granules, 2 t. minced onions, and 2/3 cups peas and carrots.
  • Add noodles to broth.
  • Cook on low boil for 15 minutes.  Enjoy!
  • Fun to cook when learning the Long OO sound.

Make and Bake Cupcakes

Lance-3

(Black Bottom Cupcakes)

These are simple to make with the filling inside.  No need to frost these.  Fun to  make with children.  Fun to make when learning  to  read long vowel A words.

1. Mix:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/3 c. sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 c. semisweet chocolate chip
  • Set aside.

2. Mix:

  • 1 ½ c. flour
  • 1 c. sugar
  • 1/4 c. cocoa
  • 1 t. baking soda
  • ½ t. salt
  • 1. c. water
  • 1/3 c. oil
  • 1 T. vinegar
  • 1 t. vanilla

3. Fill lined muffin cups ½ full with batter.

4. Place a heaping spoonful of cream cheese mixture in the middle of each cup of batter.

5. Bake at a preheated oven at 350 for 20-25 minutes.

6. Cool and Enjoy!

Family

TopFamily

Objective: Children gain knowledge of the concept of families and where they fit in as well as an understanding of rules and chores that are necessary in families.

Preparation:

  • Find pictures of families from the internet, pictures books, magazines or old calendars.
  • Have crayons for the children to draw with.
  • Have family tree work sheet. You can copy one from the following link, or draw one yourself or find one on the internet.
  • Decide on a book to read.

Suggested books:

  • Me And My Family Tree by Joan Sweeney
  • I Love My Family by Wade Hudson
  • I Am Responsible! by David Parker
  • The Family Book by Todd Parr

Lesson:
Read the book(s) then discuss:

Discuss the structure of families. These are some aspects you may want to included depending on the children you are teaching:

  • Some have step children or parents.
  • Some have single parents.
  • Some have a lot of children some only have one.
  • Many people think of other loved ones as family even if they are not related.
  • Lots of families have pets, but many don’t.
  • Uncles, aunts, cousins, grandparents are part of families.

Explain that every member of the family is important and has a role to play to make the family work like:

  • Every family member has chores and responsibilities to keep the house and yard clean, fix meals and pay bills, etc.  Ask each child what their job or chore is that contributes to their family.
  • Family member can be kind to each other to help make a happier family.  Ask what they can do to help make a happier family.
  • Rules are important in families too. Discuss rules in the families of each child has and why they are important.


Activity: Make a family tree.

  • Have each child draw pictures of themselves and other family members in each corresponding circle.
  • Have them color and decorate the tree.

Reading activities to help children at any stage of reading development.

 Stages of Reading DevelopmentOO

 Adults working with children need to know:

  • Sounds need to be learned crisply without adding an “uh” at the end.
  •  Schwa (or lazy or UH) sound is the most common sound in the English language and all vowels sometimes make that sound.

1. Children learning to hear sounds in words.

  •    Music speeds up learning of the sounds.  We have fun music with our phonics. Contact us if you would like free music and books.   info@phonicsbyspelling.com 
  •    Picture cards representing the sound, instead of something that starts with the sounds, is easier for young children to understand.  Example is the picture above from our Phonics By Spelling books.  The short oo sound is the sound you make when you lift something heavy like big books. Some words with that sound are; look, book, hook.  
  •    Rhyming games and activities.
  •    Reading and predictable readers.
  •    Show and Tell. Examples; Have children bring something that starts or ends with a sound or 2 items that rhyme. 
  •    Pick out the sounds in the beginning/middle/end from pictures of objects.
  •    Learn vowels and consonants .

2. Children starting to blend sounds: 

  •    Sounding out words aids in fluency and comprehension.  Don’t let children struggle by themselves to sound out for more than 1 or 2 seconds.  Help them sound out the words.
  •    Simple phonetic readers.
  •    Word families.
  •    Sound out 3 letter words with or without pictures.
  •    Have child unscramble simple words.  Find or print a picture of a simple word like “cat”.  Then print the letters for the word on card stock, then cut apart. Put the picture and letters together in an envelope.  
  •    Do different vowels in the middle of consonants.
  •    Do short vowel /long vowel chant with the silent e.  Make some cards with 2 words like; cap/cape, hop/hope.   Example of the chant:  cub & cube, cub & cube,  cub says ŭ, cube says ū.  
  •    Teach sight words.  Most words have some phonetic base but here are some basic words that break the rules:  one, said, says, give, have, many, they, are, any. 
  •    Teach high frequency words by their vowel sounds.  This is a list of about 200 hundred words. High Frequency Word List

3. The Beginning Reader: 

  •    Have child read simple sentences.
  •    Have child unscramble simple sentences. Write simple sentences on the computer then print and cut apart. 
  •    Review sounds and sight words in a simple book.  Then help the child read the book.
  •    Help children sound out words.
  •    Help child to break multi-syllable words into syllables then sound out.  Cover with your thumb all but one syllable then uncover each syllable will sounding out the word. 

 4. Fluent Reader:

  •   They need to read out loud right into junior high.
  •   Read things at different reading levels.  Too high creates frustration unless read with someone. Too low helps with fluency.  Just right builds vocabulary.
  •   Read along with books with CDs.
  •   Build comprehension by having children tell you what is happening in the story.
  •   Use your finger to help break words into syllables to sound out words.
  •   Pick some words to look up in the dictionary.

If you have questions or would like help teaching reading to those you love, please contact us.  info@phonicsbyspelling.com  877-206-2214

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