Make and Bake Cupcakes

Lance-3

(Black Bottom Cupcakes)

These are simple to make with the filling inside.  No need to frost these.  Fun to  make with children.  Fun to make when learning  to  read long vowel A words.

1. Mix:

  • 8 ounces cream cheese
  • 1/3 c. sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 c. semisweet chocolate chip
  • Set aside.

2. Mix:

  • 1 ½ c. flour
  • 1 c. sugar
  • 1/4 c. cocoa
  • 1 t. baking soda
  • ½ t. salt
  • 1. c. water
  • 1/3 c. oil
  • 1 T. vinegar
  • 1 t. vanilla

3. Fill lined muffin cups ½ full with batter.

4. Place a heaping spoonful of cream cheese mixture in the middle of each cup of batter.

5. Bake at a preheated oven at 350 for 20-25 minutes.

6. Cool and Enjoy!

High Frequency Words

List of High Frequency Words Listed by vowel sound.

These are lists of words to help teach children to read:  

Words for Reading Instruction   

High Frequency Words List

Ideas for teaching these words:

  • I like to teach these words as a group by each vowel sound.
  • I also will put some of them on my wall cards with half a sticky note.  
  • It is good to have the words written in groups some where visible such as a word wall.
  • Every time I teach a sound I include a few words to the wall cards for that sound.
  • This is fun to play a game with words and sounds.  http://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/Cinco-Learning-Game-10.htm 

This is a list of some of the first words I teach:

  • I
  • a
  • at
  • cat
  • she
  • he
  • see
  • me
  • my
  • why
  • red
  • the
  • yes
  • no
  • and
  • an
  • you
  • it
  • is
  • am
  • look
  • love
  • like
  • to

We have a fun bingo type games with letter sounds on one side and sight words on the other.  Check out our website.  http://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/Cinco-Learning-Game-10.htm

Long Vowel Simple Sight Words

Long Vowel Simple Sight Word Lesson: ( Free worksheets.)I (2)

Preparation:

Lesson:  Rule:  Vowels alone not followed by a consonant and at the end of a syllable, especially the first syllable, are usually long.  

  • Discuss the rule.
  • Read together all the word cards.
  • Read the story He Bear, She Bear by Stan and Jan  Berenstain.

Activity:

  • Do the worksheet/s together. Write the letter to finish the word and review the sound, combine the consonant with the long vowel and sound out the word, then draw a picture  of each word.
  • Repeat with each word.
  •  Have the children read the words to as many people as possible for their homework.

Options:

  • On the back of the worksheet have them write some other long vowel E words and draw pictures for each.  ( tree, bee, free, see, )
  • Put this sentence on the back of the worksheet.  ( See the bee in the tree.)   Have the children draw the picture for this sentence.
  • Make a simple book where they draw the pictures with these words,  He sees  _____.  She sees_____.  We see _____. I see  ______.

Vehicles

Vehicle bookVehicles

Objective: Children will learn how vehicles can help us and that vehicles travel through the air, on the land and on the water .   Note: You may want to teach vehicles in 2 or 3 lessons.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings or pictures of a variety of different types of water, land and air vehicles from books, magazines, internet, or old calendars.

  • Prepare red and green paper for the Red Light, Green Light activity.

  • Paper and crayons for making paper airplanes.

  • Print out vehicle book from the following link: vehicles book

  • Cut vehicle book into quarters then staple together to make a book.

  • Suggested books:

    • Truck Talk by Bobbi Katz

    • Follow That Boat by Jim Razzi

    • Tracks by David Galef

Lesson:

Read a book then discuss vehicles while showing pictures.

Vehicles are machines that take people or things from one place to another.  Discuss Vehicles and what they are used for:

    1.  Water:

  • Water was the first method of travel.
  • Today, ships are used to move big things around the world.
  • Often boats and ships are used fun.

     2.  Land:

  • We can travel on land in cars, buses and trains. 
  • We use these to go to school, to the park, to the grocery store, or to Grandma’s house.
  • Trains and trucks are used to move the food we eat, the clothing we wear, and materials to make homes.
  • Big vehicles are used to make roads, and buildings.
  • Some trucks deliver things like mail, furniture, etc.

    3.  Air:

  • We can travel by air in airplanes and helicopters.
  • Airplanes takes packages and mail. 
  • Helicopters help our community and world.  They are used to fight fires, help police, and move injured people to the hospital. 

    4.  Space:

  • Rockets are used to take people, satellites and other things into space.  

Possible Activities:

Play Red Light, Green Light:

  • Talk about how red means go and green means stop.
  • Have children line up in a row at least 10 feet away from you. 
  • Say, “green light” while holding up green paper.
  • The children start coming towards you.
  • Say, “red light” while holding up red paper.
  • The children stop.
  • Continue until they reach you. 
  • Variations are: Use the Spanish words “verde” and “rojo” for the colors– Let the children take turns being the stop light–They could crab walk, hop, or crawl.

Make a paper airplane:

  • Have children decorate the paper with markers or crayons.
  • Help them fold the paper to make a paper airplane.
  • Fly airplane.

Make a Vehicle book:

  • Read each page with the children.
  • Then have them draw a vehicle to go with the sentence.
  • Repeat with each page.

Microwave Caramel Popcorn

POPCORNThis is a fun easy recipe to do with children.  This can be used when teaching:

  • the sounds — OR, AR, Short O, or P.
  • the word family -op.
  • farms, seeds, plants, or heat.  

Caramel Popcorn

1.  Melt in the microwave in a large glass bowl on high for 2 minutes:

  • 1 cube butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup corn syrup
  • ½ tsp. salt

2.  Stir then microwave for 2 or 3 more minutes.

3.  Stir in ½ tsp. baking soda.

4.  Pour over 4-5 quarts of popped popcorn.

5.  Stir to mix then pour in a large brown paper grocery bag.

6.  Fold down the top then cook in the microwave for 2 minutes.

7.  Take out the bag then shake it and cook again for 1 ½ minutes.

8.   Pour out on a cookie sheet to cool.

9.  When cool break apart.

ENJOY!

Hey Diddle Diddle

Hey, Diddle, Diddle

Objective: Help children enjoy the language of the nursery rhyme,“Hey, Diddle, Diddle”.

Preparation:

Lesson:

Read the book then discuss words:

  • Action words– jumped, laughed, and ran.
  • Diddle– waste time.
  • Fiddle– a musical instrument like a violin
  • Sport– in this rhyme it means to play or have fun.  

Discussion questions:

  • What is the rhyme about?
  • Could this really happen?
  • Who plays a fiddle?
  • Who jumps over the moon?
  • Who laughs?
  • What are the dish and the spoon doing?

Activity: Hey, Diddle, Diddle, Book

Have the children write in the missing words and draw a picture to go with the sentence on each page.

The House That Jack Built

The House That Jack Built

Objective: Children will experience rhyming and language through this nursery rhyme, plus follow directions.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings, or pictures with the characters in the story.   

  • Print house template on card stock from this link: Jack’s House

  • Lightly score on broken (fold) lines.

Lesson:

Discuss words that children might not know, such as:

  • Malt — A grain, usually barley, that has been soaked in water and allowed to sprout.

  • Maiden — A teenage girl.

  • Forlorn — sad

  • Priest — A church leader that can marry people.  (Talk about what the leader of your church is called that might marry people.) 

  • Shorn — shaved and clean

  • Morn — morning

  • Cock — a rooster or male bird.

Discuss words that rhyme with corn and make the poem sing. (corn, horn, torn, shorn, morn,)  Are there other words that rhyme with “corn”? 

Read “The House That Jack Built”  (You may want to have the children repeat with you part of the repetitive part at the end of each verse.)

This is the House That Jack Built

This is the house that Jack built!

This is the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat that killed the rat
That ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer sowing his corn
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built!

Activity:  Make house.

  • Have children decorate their houses.  Show them which parts of the house are the walls and the roof.  

  • Read the words on the roof, then have them write their name in the blank. 

  • Have children cut out the houses on the (solid) cut lines only.

  • Have children glue the tab A to opposite wall a and the tab B of the roof to the inside of the opposite wall b. (Tabs on sides of roof can overhang to make “eaves”.)

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