Archive for the ‘Phonics and Reading’ Category

Granola

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Granola

 

Heat the oven to 300 F with the rack in the middle.

Place in a large bowl and mix:

  • 3 cups rolled oats (not quick oats)
  • 1/4 cup almond flour or regular flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Place in a pan and warm to melt:

  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil

Put 1/4 cup pure maple syrup or 1 teaspoon vanilla in the honey/oil mixture. 

Then pour over the oats mixture and mix.

Spread the mixture on a rimmed cookie sheet lined with parchment paper.

Bake for 15 minutes then stir.  Bake for 5 to 10 more minutes until lightly brown around the edges.

Place on a rack to cool.

Add about 1/2 cup of dried fruit (cranberries, cherries, raisins, dates) and about 1/2 cup of nuts or seeds (I prefer pecans.)   I also add about a 1/2 cup of ribbon coconut.

Stir every 15 minutes as it cools to break up the clumps.

Store in airtight container.

Enjoy!   We like it with Cashew Milk.  

 

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Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 2 (two)

Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 2 (two)

Objective:  Help children recognize the number 2 and the word “two”, numbers are used for counting, count 2 objects, learn to write “2” and “two”.

Preparations:

  • Find an art print or picture from a calendar or magazine with good examples of “TWO”.
  • Optional:  Have connecting blocks or die-cut paper apples in two colors.
  • Have stickers.
  • Write the number “2” and the word “two” on a word card.  Use the “1 one “ word card from the “ONE” lesson.
  • Decide on a simple book, poem or nursery rhyme that has good examples of two.  Possibly use, “One, Two, Buckle my Shoe”.  (Included at the end.)
  • Have colored paper and pencil for each child.

Lesson Ideas:

  • Display the word card with “2 two”.  Discuss the difference between the number “2” and the word “two”.  Compare to the number “1 one” card.
  • Read a simple book or poem.  Discuss the examples of two. Discuss different body parts to see how many they have.  Do you have two legs?  two eyes? Etc.
  • Show the picture and have each child pick out two things in the picture.
  • Show how to make the number 2.  Have them make them in the air with their finger.  Have them close their eyes and write the number 2 in the air.
  • Give each child a paper and pencil.  Have or help them write their name.  Show the word card again for “2 two”.  Have them write a number “2” several times, and the word “two”.  (If a child has a hard time writing their letters, write the word “two” with a yellow pencil and have them trace it.)  Put out stickers and have them select 2 for their paper.  (They could also draw two things.)

Extension ideas:  Possibly include some comparison or patterning activities with connecting blocks or die-cut apples.  (small, medium, large, same, different, AABB pattern, etc.)

Nursery Rhyme:
One, two, Buckle my shoe;
Three, four, Shut the door;
Five, six, Pick up sticks;
Seven, eight, Lay them straight;

For more educational products and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Letter Formation

Teaching Handwriting

Teaching a one-stroke method for Lowercase letters (except for “f, i, j, k, t, and x”) makes handwriting easier, neater, faster, and makes cursive easier when they are older.   Letters are started one of 4 ways:

  1. First, “l, i, j, t, h, b, p, r, n, and m” are started with a straight line down, and finished with an up and over the hill in the case of “h, b, p, r, n, and m”.   The “b” is made by coming straight down, then up and over like an “h”, then tucked under.  (Associating “b” with “h” and helping children connect their similarities will help children keep “b” and “d” straight in their mind.)
  2. Second, the letters “a, d, g, q, s, and o” are started by writing a “c”.  Such as, “a” starts like a “c”, then go up and touch where the “c” starts, and come straight down.  Wait about 6 weeks after you have taught “b”, to introduce “d”.  This will help children keep these two letters straight.  Associating “d” with “a” and connecting their similarities, will help children be less confused between “b” and “d”.  Most children get them mixed-up.  Just keep comparing “b” to “h” and “d” to “a”, and they will eventually get it straight.  Here is a sample instruction for “d”:   “d” is made by starting at the broken line, go around like a “c”, then go up to the top line, then come straight down to the bottom line.
  3. Third, “u” and “y” are started by drawing a smile, then come straight down.  In the case of “y”, add a hook like in the j and g (For example see picture below).  Teaching “y” this way will do two things.  It will make the “y” easier, and it won’t look like an “x”.  Also, it will make the transition to cursive easier.
  4. Fourth, v, w, x, k, and z are the angled letters.  These are harder for children to form.  Teach these later in your instruction, unless the child has one in their name.

We have phonics based lesson plans that provide great ideas for kindergarten, preschool, or home schools.  Visit our website.  www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Discipline Tip–First Day of School

Discipline Tip—First Day of School       TH

 

The beginning of a new school year is a good time to set the tone for the year at home and in the classroom.  Here are a few tips to make the first day of school the start of a great year:

·       Know every child’s name and work to make each feel welcome to your class or your home.  It is fun to sing a simple song that includes each child’s name, for example “Here we are together, together, together.  Here we are together in our school.  There’s ____, and _____, and (continue to include all the children).

·       Only have a few rules and voice them in a positive manner.  (Never use the word “Don’t”.  It just puts ideas in their heads.)  Sample rule:  “In our school everyone treats everyone kindly.” (Then invite the children to create ideas of how they can treat each other kindly.  With children who can read you can help them create a list of the positive ideas the children come up with.)

·       SMILE!

·       Believe children can mind and behave.  Your attitude is contagious.  

·       Plan fun, simple, and short activities.  Keep it a fun, interesting day. 

·       Set a simple routine.  This way, children know what to look forward to each day.  Vary the activities inside the routine.

·       Never use bribery.

Have a great, enjoyable new school year.

For more educational tips and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 1 (One)

Math Lesson for the Number 1 (One)

ObjectiveHelp children recognize the number 1, the word “one”, numbers are used for counting, count 1 object, and learn to write “l” and “one”.

Preparations:

  • Find an art print or picture from a calendar or magazine with good examples of “ONE”.
  • Optional:  Make some die cuts of apples or something else in two different colors and 3 different sizes.
  • Have some stickers.
  • Write the number “l” and the word, “one” on a word card.
  • Have examples of the different fonts of the printed form of 1.
  • Decide on a simple book, poem or nursery rhyme that has good examples of “one”.  Possibly use, “There Was a Crooked Man”.  (Included at the end.)
  • Have paper and pencil for each child.

Lesson:

  • Display the word card with “l one”.  Discuss the difference between the number “1” and the word “one”.  What are words made of?  (letters)  What are numbers used for?  (counting)
  • Read  a book, poem or the Nursery Rhyme.  Then discuss the examples of one thing in the reading. Discuss different body parts to see how many they have.  Do you have 1 eye?  1 nose? Etc.
  • Show the picture and have each child pick out one thing in the picture.
  • Show the children examples of different fonts for the number one.  Encourage them to write their l’s with a straight line like an “l”.  Have them make them in the air with their finger.
  • Give each child a paper and pencil.  Have or help them write their name.  Show the word card again for “l one”.  Have them write a number “l” and a word “one”.  (If a child has a hard time writing their letters, write the word “one” with a yellow pencil and have them trace it.)  Put out stickers and have them select 1 for their paper.

Extension ideas: Possibly include some comparison or patterning activities with the die cut apples.  (small, medium, large, same, different, ABAB pattern, etc.)   Can also do a food activity with several 1 items.

Nursery Rhyme

There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile;

He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile:
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

For more educational tips and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Have a Routine.

Routine is one of the keys to successful discipline.

It is a new school year which is a great time to set your routine.  Everything will go smoother with a routine.

  • It is good to have a routine or schedule.  It will help your day run smoother.

  • Whether it is in a classroom or at home, children handle everything better if they know the routine (Bed time, reading time, homework time, etc.).

  • Most children feel more comfortable with an established routine.

  • When the routine has to be changed, it will go smoother if they are told in advance the routine will be changed.

  • Children need to learn to handle last-minute changes but it is good to practice that in a controlled situation, not when you need it to happen now.

Alphabet

Alphabet Lesson

(The letter sounds are more important for reading than the letter names, but the letter names give you and the child a vocabulary for learning to read.  Work on both letter sounds and names, but give the sounds more focus.  Make sure phonics sounds are made clearly without an “UH” at the end.)

Objective:  To create an awareness of letters and their sounds in children and, informally assess what they know.  Also, to help children recognize the first sound in their name.

Preparation:

  • Copy the ABC song, one for each child, on colored card stock.   ABC song
  • Have music and pictures of the letter sound. http://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/  (Optional)
  • Have a name card for each child.
  • Have tracing paper and pencils.

Lesson:

  • Give each child an alphabet card and sing the ABC song.  Have each child touch the letters as you sing the song.  You may need to sing the song real slow the first time.  Sing it slow from Ll to Pp.  End the song with, “next time won’t you touch the letters with me.”  This will help children connect the song to the letters.  Do this song several times over the next few weeks.
  • If you have the music and pictures for each sound, http://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/  play the song for the first letter in every child’s name while showing their name card.

Activities:

Give each child their name card, tracing paper and a pencil.  Let them trace their name.  Then have them write their name without tracing.  (This activity lets you assess their writing skills, while still being fun.)

An additional activity is to make a name book for each child.   These can be the words for the four pages.   (My name is ______.  I am ______ years old.   I like school.  I like ________.) Children can draw the pictures for each page.

For more educational tips and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

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