Posts Tagged ‘free lesson plan’

Apples

Apples

Objective:  Help children discover and learn about apples.
Preparation:
  • Find drawings or pictures of apples and apple trees from books, magazines or old calendars.
  • Gather the following materials; Apples, Knife, Paper, Paint: red; yellow and green, Paper plate. 
  • Decide on a book to read.     Suggested books: The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall ,The Seasons of Arnold’s Apple Tree by Gail Gibbons,Ten Apples Up On Top! By Theo LeSieg.,
Lesson:
  • Read a book. 
  • Discuss apples while showing apples, pictures and/or books.  Apples are a fruit, plant, have seeds.
  • Discuss the changes through the seasons in apple trees.  Can be discussed with seasons
  • Fruits are a healthy food. 
  • It is fun to cut an apple in half horizontally to show the children the star pattern created by the core and seeds.  Use this apple to do the apple stamping in the activity below.

Discussion Questions:

  • What color are apples?  Red, yellow, green or a combination of colors.
  • How do they grow?  On apple trees.
  • How do they taste?  Sweet, crunchy, juicy.
  • What can we make with apples?  applesauce, apple juice, apple pie, apple cake, etc.

Activity: Apple Stamping  (It is fun to use red, yellow and green paint and make a stamping of each color.  Keep an apple in each color of paint and don’t mix colors.  Use paint shirts.  Do with one child at a time.)  

  • Cut your apple in half( for an apple-shaped stamp cut the apple vertically – cutting it horizontally makes a circular shaped stamp.)
  • Pour paint onto a pie tin or plastic plate.
  • Dip your apple into the paint.
  • Stamp your apples on the paper.  If the apples are carefully stamped, the star may be visible.  
  • Set aside to dry.

Making Applesauce is a fun activity with children.  Applesauce blog to be posted soon.

For more educational products and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

 

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Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 2 (two)

Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 2 (two)

Objective:  Help children recognize the number 2 and the word “two”, numbers are used for counting, count 2 objects, learn to write “2” and “two”.

Preparations:

  • Find an art print or picture from a calendar or magazine with good examples of “TWO”.
  • Optional:  Have connecting blocks or die-cut paper apples in two colors.
  • Have stickers.
  • Write the number “2” and the word “two” on a word card.  Use the “1 one “ word card from the “ONE” lesson.
  • Decide on a simple book, poem or nursery rhyme that has good examples of two.  Possibly use, “One, Two, Buckle my Shoe”.  (Included at the end.)
  • Have colored paper and pencil for each child.

Lesson Ideas:

  • Display the word card with “2 two”.  Discuss the difference between the number “2” and the word “two”.  Compare to the number “1 one” card.
  • Read a simple book or poem.  Discuss the examples of two. Discuss different body parts to see how many they have.  Do you have two legs?  two eyes? Etc.
  • Show the picture and have each child pick out two things in the picture.
  • Show how to make the number 2.  Have them make them in the air with their finger.  Have them close their eyes and write the number 2 in the air.
  • Give each child a paper and pencil.  Have or help them write their name.  Show the word card again for “2 two”.  Have them write a number “2” several times, and the word “two”.  (If a child has a hard time writing their letters, write the word “two” with a yellow pencil and have them trace it.)  Put out stickers and have them select 2 for their paper.  (They could also draw two things.)

Extension ideas:  Possibly include some comparison or patterning activities with connecting blocks or die-cut apples.  (small, medium, large, same, different, AABB pattern, etc.)

Nursery Rhyme:
One, two, Buckle my shoe;
Three, four, Shut the door;
Five, six, Pick up sticks;
Seven, eight, Lay them straight;

For more educational products and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Letter Formation

Teaching Handwriting

Teaching a one-stroke method for Lowercase letters (except for “f, i, j, k, t, and x”) makes handwriting easier, neater, faster, and makes cursive easier when they are older.   Letters are started one of 4 ways:

  1. First, “l, i, j, t, h, b, p, r, n, and m” are started with a straight line down, and finished with an up and over the hill in the case of “h, b, p, r, n, and m”.   The “b” is made by coming straight down, then up and over like an “h”, then tucked under.  (Associating “b” with “h” and helping children connect their similarities will help children keep “b” and “d” straight in their mind.)
  2. Second, the letters “a, d, g, q, s, and o” are started by writing a “c”.  Such as, “a” starts like a “c”, then go up and touch where the “c” starts, and come straight down.  Wait about 6 weeks after you have taught “b”, to introduce “d”.  This will help children keep these two letters straight.  Associating “d” with “a” and connecting their similarities, will help children be less confused between “b” and “d”.  Most children get them mixed-up.  Just keep comparing “b” to “h” and “d” to “a”, and they will eventually get it straight.  Here is a sample instruction for “d”:   “d” is made by starting at the broken line, go around like a “c”, then go up to the top line, then come straight down to the bottom line.
  3. Third, “u” and “y” are started by drawing a smile, then come straight down.  In the case of “y”, add a hook like in the j and g (For example see picture below).  Teaching “y” this way will do two things.  It will make the “y” easier, and it won’t look like an “x”.  Also, it will make the transition to cursive easier.
  4. Fourth, v, w, x, k, and z are the angled letters.  These are harder for children to form.  Teach these later in your instruction, unless the child has one in their name.

We have phonics based lesson plans that provide great ideas for kindergarten, preschool, or home schools.  Visit our website.  www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 1 (One)

Math Lesson for the Number 1 (One)

ObjectiveHelp children recognize the number 1, the word “one”, numbers are used for counting, count 1 object, and learn to write “l” and “one”.

Preparations:

  • Find an art print or picture from a calendar or magazine with good examples of “ONE”.
  • Optional:  Make some die cuts of apples or something else in two different colors and 3 different sizes.
  • Have some stickers.
  • Write the number “l” and the word, “one” on a word card.
  • Have examples of the different fonts of the printed form of 1.
  • Decide on a simple book, poem or nursery rhyme that has good examples of “one”.  Possibly use, “There Was a Crooked Man”.  (Included at the end.)
  • Have paper and pencil for each child.

Lesson:

  • Display the word card with “l one”.  Discuss the difference between the number “1” and the word “one”.  What are words made of?  (letters)  What are numbers used for?  (counting)
  • Read  a book, poem or the Nursery Rhyme.  Then discuss the examples of one thing in the reading. Discuss different body parts to see how many they have.  Do you have 1 eye?  1 nose? Etc.
  • Show the picture and have each child pick out one thing in the picture.
  • Show the children examples of different fonts for the number one.  Encourage them to write their l’s with a straight line like an “l”.  Have them make them in the air with their finger.
  • Give each child a paper and pencil.  Have or help them write their name.  Show the word card again for “l one”.  Have them write a number “l” and a word “one”.  (If a child has a hard time writing their letters, write the word “one” with a yellow pencil and have them trace it.)  Put out stickers and have them select 1 for their paper.

Extension ideas: Possibly include some comparison or patterning activities with the die cut apples.  (small, medium, large, same, different, ABAB pattern, etc.)   Can also do a food activity with several 1 items.

Nursery Rhyme

There was a crooked man, and he went a crooked mile;

He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile:
He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse,
And they all lived together in a little crooked house.

For more educational tips and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Teach about Summer–The Season

Summer

Objective: Help children see and experience summer and how it is different to other seasons.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings or pictures from books, magazines or old calendars of summer activities, food, and sun protection items.
  • Print the attached worksheet. Downloadable PDF link: summer vs. winter worksheet
  • A world globe and lamp.
  • Decide on a book to read.  Suggested books: The Wonderful Tree, by Adelaide Holl,  Wake Up, Jeremiah, by Ann Himler,   The Sky Dog, by Brinton Turkle,   Frog and Toad Together, by Arnold Lobel The Reasons for Seasons by Gail Gibbons

Lesson:

Read a book(s) then discuss while showing pictures:

Discussion Questions:

  • Why do we have summer?  Summer is the time when our part of the earth tilts towards the sun.  This can be demonstrated by holding the lamp next to the globe and explaining how the Earth is tilted on its axis.  Put a sticker on the globe where you live.  Rotate the globe around the lamp showing when their part of the Earth is tilted more toward the Sun it causes the sun to rise higher in the sky it causes longer days.  The rays of the sun hit the earth more directly causing hotter weather.  When their part of the  Earth is tilted away from the Sun it is winter.  The Sun rises low in the sky, and causes shorter days.  The rays of the sun strike the ground indirectly causing colder weather.
  • What is the weather/temperature like in the summer?  It is the warmest season of the year.
  • What are some ways to protect ourselves from heat and sunburn?  Protect yourself by using sunscreen, wearing a hat, wearing sunglasses, drinking a lot of water, etc.
  • What kind of things do we do in the summer?  We play in the water. go on vacations/camping. celebrate the fourth of July, ride bikes, have picnics, play summer sports like baseball and soccer, etc.
  • What kind of foods are fun to eat or drink in the summer?  We eat ice cream, Popsicles, watermelon, etc.
  • How is summer different from winter?  We wear lighter clothes.  It is hot outside.  

Activity: Worksheet 

How do we dress differently in the summer than in the winter?  Have the children do the attached worksheet. Discuss with them what each picture is and to which column it belongs. Ask why each article of clothing would be appropriate for that season.

For more educational products and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

Number Ten 10

ten paper 2016-03-19 001Math Lesson Ideas for the Number 10 (ten)

Objective:  Help children recognize the number 10 and the word “ten”, numbers are used for counting, count 10 objects, patterning, learn to write “10” and “ten”.

Preparations:

  • A picture of ten objects or some example of ten such as the book, Ten Black Dots.
  • Have connecting blocks or some other items with two colors enough for each child to have 10, two of each color.
  • Have star stickers. (Enough so each child has 10, 5 of two different colors.)
  • Write the number “10” and the word “ten” on a word card.  Use number cards from other lessons.
  • Decide on a simple book, poem, song or nursery rhyme that has good examples of ten.  Possibly use, “One little, two little, three little fingers” to the tune of Little Indians.  (Included at the end.)
  • Have a half sheet of paper and pencil for each child.
  • Copy a Ten book for each child. book ten 10
  • Select a TEN book such as: Little Rabbits’ First Number Book by Alan Baker; One Duck Stuck by Phyllis Root; Ten Black Dots by Donald Crews; Ten Tall Giraffes by Brian Moses.

Lesson:

  • Display the word card with “10 ten”.  Discuss the difference between the number “10” and the word “ten”.  Compare to the other number cards.
  • Sing “Little Fingers” or some other poem or song.  Discuss the examples of ten.  (fingers, toes, etc.)
  • Show the picture and have each child in turn pick out ten things in the picture or read and discuss the book Ten Black Dots.
  • Give each child 10 connect blocks (5 of each color).  Have them make an ABAB pattern with the blocks.  Show them an example.  Count the blocks.
  • Show how to make the number 10.  Have them make them in the air with their finger.  Have them close their eyes and write the number 10 in the air.

Activities:

  • Give each child a paper and pencils.  Have them write their name.  Show the word card again for “10 ten”.  Have them write word “ten” and the number “10.”  Give them two colors of star stickers and have them select 10 for their paper. (5 of two different colors.) Have them put them on the paper in an ABAB pattern.
  • Read with the children the take-home Ten Count the on each page.  Have them draw ten of one object on the last page.  book ten 10  
  • Read a selected TEN book. (preparations)

Song: To the tune of Ten Little Indians.

  • One little, two little, three little fingers,
  • Four little, five little, six little fingers,
  • Seven little, eight little, nine little fingers,
  • Ten little fingers on my hands.
  • Ten little, nine little, eight little fingers,
  • Seven little, six little, five little fingers,
  • Four little, three little, two little fingers,
  • One little finger on my hand.

Cooking: Ten Treats  (Marshmallow Treats with 10 mini chocolate chips added by each child.)

Word family -EN

   hen 2016-02-04 002

 Lesson for –EN Words  

 Objective:  Help children make the connection between letter, sounds and reading by using the word family –EN.  (This lesson can be adapted to use for other word families. rhyming words -ig rhyming words -op rhyming words -uck)   

 Preparation:

  •  Copy –en worksheet for each child. rhyming words -en
  •  Use word family flannel letters or magnet letters.
  •  Phonics By Spelling music
  •  Suggested book: Jen the hen by Sue Graves

 Lesson:

  •  Play Phonics songs starting with Evan’s Door (Short vowel E). Do most of the consonants to Z and skip the vowels. 
  •  Read Jen the Hen, or an other rhyming -EN book. 
  •  Read the Riddles for –EN to the children.
    •  More than one man is called ___. Men
    •  The number after nine is ___. Ten
    •  You can write with a ____. Pen
    •  This animal has baby chicks. Hen
    •  A home for a bear is a ___. Den
  •  Use Magnet letters or flannel board letters to make the word family words for –EN.  Let each children pick a consonant and see if it makes a word.

 Activity: -EN worksheet

  •  Cut the pictures from the bottom of the worksheet for EN words.  Give the children scissors and the pictures to cut on the broken lines. 
  • Then trade scissors with glue sticks and the worksheet with the words.  Help the children read the first word and talk about the picture.  Help the children read the next word and find the picture to match then glue on the picture. 
  • Invite the children to read the rest and find the picture to match.  Say you will help them sound out the words if they need it. 
  • Then give them colored pencils to write their names and color any pictures. 
  • This activity can be extended by having them write on the back a sentence or words such as: “Ben has ten hens in a pen.”, “Ten hens” or “then”.   
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