Posts Tagged ‘nursery rhymes’

Hey Diddle Diddle

Hey, Diddle, Diddle

Objective: Help children enjoy the language of the nursery rhyme,“Hey, Diddle, Diddle”.

Preparation:

Lesson:

  • Hey, diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
  • The cow jumped over the moon.
  • The little dog laughed to see such a sport,
  • And the dish ran away with the spoon.

Read the book or the rhyme then discuss words:

  • Action words– jumped, laughed, and ran.
  • Diddle– waste time.
  • Fiddle– a musical instrument like a violin
  • Sport– in this rhyme it means to play or have fun.  

Discussion questions:

  • What is the rhyme about?
  • Could this really happen?
  • Who plays a fiddle?
  • Who jumps over the moon?
  • Who laughed?
  • What are the dish and the spoon doing?

Activity: Hey, Diddle, Diddle, Book

Have the children write in the missing words and draw a picture to go with the sentence on each page.

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The House That Jack Built

The House That Jack Built

Objective: Children will experience rhyming and language through this nursery rhyme, plus follow directions.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings, or pictures with the characters in the story.   
  • Print house template on card stock from this link: Jack’s House
  • Lightly score on broken (fold) lines.

Lesson:

Discuss words that children might not know, such as:

  • Malt — A grain, usually barley, that has been soaked in water and allowed to sprout.
  • Maiden — A teenage girl.
  • Forlorn — sad
  • Priest — A church leader that can marry people.  (Talk about what the leader of your church is called that might marry people.) 
  • Shorn — shaved and clean
  • Morn — morning
  • Cock — a rooster or male bird.

Discuss words that rhyme with corn and make the poem sing. (corn, horn, torn, shorn, morn,)  Are there other words that rhyme with “corn”? 

Read “The House That Jack Built”  (You may want to have the children repeat with you part of the repetitive part at the end of each verse.)

This is the House That Jack Built

This is the house that Jack built!

This is the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.
This is the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cat that killed the rat
That ate the malt that lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built.

This is the farmer sowing his corn
That kept the cock that crowed in the morn
That waked the priest all shaven and shorn
That married the man all tattered and torn
That kissed the maiden all forlorn
That milked the cow with the crumpled horn
That tossed the dog that worried the cat
That killed the rat that ate the malt
That lay in the house that Jack built!

Activity:  Make house.

  • Have children decorate their houses.  Show them which parts of the house are the walls and the roof.  
  • Read the words on the roof, then have them write their name in the blank. 
  • Have children cut out the houses on the (solid) cut lines only.
  • Have children glue the tab A to opposite wall a and the tab B of the roof to the inside of the opposite wall b. (Tabs on sides of roof can overhang to make “eaves”.)

Little Miss Muffet

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Little Miss Muffet

Objective:  Help children learn about spiders and counting through the nursery rhyme, “Little Miss Muffet”.

Preparation:

  • Find pictures of spiders.  (The internet is a great source.)
  • Find drawings or picture book of Little Miss Muffet.
  • Do the following for each sack puppet :
    • Cut a sheet of black construction paper 5 ¼” wide.
    • Cut off 3 ½” so you have 2 rectangles one 5 ¼” x 3 ½” (spider’s face) the other one will be 5 ¼ x 5 ½ (spider’s belly).
    • Using the remaining part of your sheet of black construction paper to cut 8 strips ½” wide for the legs.
    • Have pre-cut foam shapes, googly eyes, or other shapes of construction paper.
    • White school glue. 
    • Crayons for finishing the spider.
    • White crayons. 
    • Print and cut out the rhyme “Little Miss Muffet” from this link: little miss muffet

Lesson:
Read the rhyme then discuss;

  • Little Miss Muffet,
  • Sat on a tuffet,
  • Eating her curds and whey.
  • Along came a spider
  • And (or Who) sat down beside her
  • And frightened Miss Muffet away.

Define these words:

  • The word tuffet was once a common word for a short stool, such as a footstool.
  • Curds and whey are what we call cottage cheese.
  • Frightened means scared.
  • Discuss the concepts of BESIDE, AWAY, and ON.
  • Discuss spiders and insects. Explain that spiders have 8 legs and insects only have 6 legs.
  • Spiders are called Arachnids.

Discussion Questions:

  • Who sat on a tuffet?
  • Who ate curds and whey?
  • Who frightened Miss Muffet?
  • Where did the spider go?
  • What frightens you?

Activity: Make Spider Sack Puppets

Have the children follow these steps::

  • Glue the face onto the flap of the paper sack.
  • Accordion fold the strips (legs) then unfold. (You can do legs straight.)
  • Glue or staple 4 strips to each side of the front of the bag.
  • Glue the belly on to the side of the sack below the flap on top of the ends of the legs. Take care not to glue the flap down.
  • Glue on eight eyes and designs.
  • Decorate the spider with crayons.  
  • Write the word “spider” with white crayon on the spider’s belly.
  • Glue the rhyme “Little Miss Muffet” to the back of the puppet.

Great lesson plans on our website; http://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/

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