Posts Tagged ‘seasons’

Teach about Summer–The Season

Summer

Objective: Help children see and experience summer and how it is different to other seasons.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings or pictures from books, magazines or old calendars of summer activities, food, and sun protection items.
  • Print the attached worksheet. Downloadable PDF link: summer vs. winter worksheet
  • A world globe and lamp.
  • Decide on a book to read.  Suggested books: The Wonderful Tree, by Adelaide Holl,  Wake Up, Jeremiah, by Ann Himler,   The Sky Dog, by Brinton Turkle,   Frog and Toad Together, by Arnold Lobel The Reasons for Seasons by Gail Gibbons

Lesson:

Read a book(s) then discuss while showing pictures:

Discussion Questions:

  • Why do we have summer?  Summer is the time when our part of the earth tilts towards the sun.  This can be demonstrated by holding the lamp next to the globe and explaining how the Earth is tilted on its axis.  Put a sticker on the globe where you live.  Rotate the globe around the lamp showing when their part of the Earth is tilted more toward the Sun it causes the sun to rise higher in the sky it causes longer days.  The rays of the sun hit the earth more directly causing hotter weather.  When their part of the  Earth is tilted away from the Sun it is winter.  The Sun rises low in the sky, and causes shorter days.  The rays of the sun strike the ground indirectly causing colder weather.
  • What is the weather/temperature like in the summer?  It is the warmest season of the year.
  • What are some ways to protect ourselves from heat and sunburn?  Protect yourself by using sunscreen, wearing a hat, wearing sunglasses, drinking a lot of water, etc.
  • What kind of things do we do in the summer?  We play in the water. go on vacations/camping. celebrate the fourth of July, ride bikes, have picnics, play summer sports like baseball and soccer, etc.
  • What kind of foods are fun to eat or drink in the summer?  We eat ice cream, Popsicles, watermelon, etc.
  • How is summer different from winter?  We wear lighter clothes.  It is hot outside.  

Activity: Worksheet 

How do we dress differently in the summer than in the winter?  Have the children do the attached worksheet. Discuss with them what each picture is and to which column it belongs. Ask why each article of clothing would be appropriate for that season.

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The Sun

The Sun

Objective:  Help students discover how the light and heat from the sun affects life on the earth.

Preparation:

  • Find pictures of the sun and solar system.

  • Find a globe or a ball to use as a globe.
  • Find a lamp without a shade.  (A lamp that shines in all directions like the sun.)
  • Print out template on yellow paper or card stock or make your own sun shaped frame.  (1 for each child.) sun template
  • Trace circles onto clear contact paper about 1 inch diameter larger than the circle in the center of sun frame.  (2 for each child.)
  • Painters tape or masking tape.
  • Yarn or string for hanging the Sun catcher.
  • Tear or cut yellow, orange and red tissue paper into about one inch squares.
  • Suggested book:  Sun Up, Sun Down by Gail Gibbons   

Lesson:

Read the book then discuss the sun while showing pictures.

Some discussion ideas:

  • The sun is the closest star (fiery ball of gas) to Earth and is at the center of our solar system.
  • Its gravity holds all planets and objects in the solar system in orbit.
  • The sun’s diameter is about 109 times that of the Earth.
  • The sun’s energy drives the weather, and climate.
  • The sun supports all life on Earth helping plants and animals grow.
  • The sun shines down on the Earth, giving warmth and light.
  • The sun makes the seasons. As the earth makes one complete rotation around the sun every year, the seasons on the earth change — from winter to spring to summer to fall and back to winter again.
  • Our Earth is about 93,000,000 miles from the sun. To give you an idea about how far that is, suppose we could build a highway and drive a car to the sun. Let’s drive 65 miles per hour. It would take over 160 YEARS to get there!

Demonstrate how the Sun and Earth work together:

  • Locate your city, state or country on the globe. using the lamp as the Sun, slowly rotate the globe and showing students how the Earth rotates, resulting in day and night. 
  • You can also demonstrate seasons by holding the lamp next to the globe and explaining how the earth is tilted on its axis. Rotate the globe around the lamp showing how the Northern Hemisphere is tilted more toward the Sun which causes the sun to rise higher in the sky and set later causing longer days. The rays of the sun hit the earth more directly causing hotter weather or Summer.  Winter in the Northern Hemisphere, the Earth is tilted away from the Sun.  The Sun rises low in the sky, and sets earlier causing shorter days. The rays of the sun strike the ground more indirectly causing colder weather.


Activity: Help the children make a sun catcher.  Let them do as much as they are able:

  • Cut out the sun and the circle in the center.
  • Cut out the contact or self-laminating paper circles.
  • Peel off the backing of one of the contact paper circles and tape onto table sticky side up with painters tape or masking tape.
  • Stick frame onto the contact paper.
  • Stick overlapping pieces of tissue paper on the contact paper.
  • When completely filled with tissue paper, stick another circle of contact paper to the top, then remove tape.
  • Use a hole punch or the end of a pencil to make a hole in the paper frame and thread a piece of yarn through and tie the ends together so that the sun catcher can be hung.
  • Stick frame onto the contact paper.

    Stick frame onto the contact paper.

    Stick overlapping pieces of tissue paper on the contact paper.

    Stick overlapping pieces of tissue paper on the contact paper.

     

    Vehicle book (5 of 7)

    When completely filled with tissue paper stick another circle of contact paper to the top, then remove tape.

    When completely filled with tissue paper stick another circle of contact paper to the top, then remove tape.

     

    Vehicle book (7 of 7)

Winter

Winter        snowflakes part 1 001     snowflakes part 2 001

Objective: Children learn about winter and its weather.

Preparation:

  • winter pictures from magazines, calendars and the internet.
  • coffee filters
  • scissors
  • Suggested Books:

            Curious George in the Snow By H.A. Rey

            The Snowy Day By Ezra Jack Keats

            A Day on Skates By Hilda van Stockum

            Snowmen at Night By Caralyn Buehner

            Snowflake Bently By Jacqueline Briggs Martin

            The Snowman By Raymond Briggs

            A Winter’s Tale By Beatrix Potter

Lesson:

Read a book(s) then discuss Winter.

  • The tilt of the Earth creates the seasons. The tilted Earth causes different parts of the Earth to directly face the Sun, while other parts are hit indirectly by the sun’s rays causing the weather to be colder.  (This can be shown with a globe and a lamp.)
  • Winter is the coldest season of the year. We must wear warm clothes like gloves, hats, scarves, coats and boots.
  • In the winter we have less daylight.
  • Winter is the time we get to play in the snow. We like to build snowmen, make snow angels and throw snowballs. We can also do winter sports like skiing, sledding and ice skating.
  • Snowflakes have 6 points. 

Activity:  Make coffee filter snowflakes.

  snowflakes part 1 001     snowflakes part 2 001

This activity is a fun and an easy way to make paper snowflakes. 

  1. Flatten coffee filter
  2. Fold it in half
  3. Fold the half into thirds
  4. Then fold in half again.
  5. Cut shapes along the folded edges and the outside edge of the filter.

 Check out our website for fun phonics and reading materials.  http://www.phonicsbyspelling.com/ 

 

Teach about Fall

Fall

Objective: Teach children about fall (autumn) and how it is different from other seasons.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings or pictures of fall activities, fall foliage, and fall food from books, magazines, or old calendars
  • Print out this PDF of the Tree book.    tree book    Cut into fourths and staple together along the side to make a four page book.
  • Have crayons, markers or colored pencils.
  • Decide on a book to read. Suggested books: 
    • Clifford’s First Autumn (Clifford the Small Red Puppy) by Norman Bridwell, 
    • When Autumn Comes by Robert Maass, 
    • Fall by Chris L. Demarest, 
    • Autumn Story by Jill Barklem

Lesson:

Read the book(s) then discuss the changing colors and cooling temperatures of fall while showing pictures.

Explain that some people call autumn, “fall,” which refers to the leaves falling off the trees during this season.

Show the pictures and discuss.

Discussion Questions

  • When does this season occur? The first day of autumn (fall) is celebrated on the fall equinox – a time when both night and day are equal. September 22 or 23rd is the first day of autumn.
  • What happens to the leaves on the trees?  The leaves change color.
  • Why do leaves changes colors in the fall? During winter, there is not enough light or water for photosynthesis.  The trees will rest, and live off the food they stored during the summer.  In the fall they begin to shut down their food-making factories.  The green chlorophyll disappears from the leaves.  As the bright green fades away, we begin to see yellow, red and orange colors.
  • What is the weather like?  The weather gets cooler.
  • What kind of things do we do in the fall? Explain that many animals, such as squirrels, are busy during the fall collecting food to survive the winter months ahead.  People harvest food and prepare it for winter, go back to school, watch and play football, etc.
  • What kind of foods do we eat in the fall?  Apples, pumpkins, potatoes and other vegetables and fruits.
  • What holidays take place in the fall? Thanksgiving, Halloween

Activity:  Tree Book

  • Have the children color the tree on each page to each season.
  • Winterjust color the trunk and branches with no leaves.  (Talk about why this is called a bare tree.)
  • Spring—color the trunk and draw in some green leaves and pink blossoms.
  • Summer—color the trunk and draw in green leaves.
  • Fall—color the trunk and draw in red, yellow and orange leaves on and under the tree.

For more educational products and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

 

  

 

Leaves and Trees

Leaves and Trees

Objective:  Children will learn about leaves, trees and their parts.

Preparation:

  • Find drawings or pictures of trees from books, magazines or old calendars.
  • Crayons without the paper wrapping on them. (green, red, orange, yellow, brown)
  • Thin Paper like tracing paper or coffee fillers.
  • Leaves freshly picked.  (If the leaves are too old they will crumble.)
  • Decide on a book to read.  Suggested books:
    • Trees by Peggy Gavan
    • Treats From a Tree by Susan Canizares

Lesson:

Read a book then discuss trees and leaves.

It is fun if you have trees to go outside and discover the parts of a tree and gather leaves.

Show pictures and discuss:

Why are trees important?

  • Trees grow much of the fruits and nuts we eat.
  • Trees prevent soil erosion.
  • Trees provide many animals with shelter and food.
  • Trees produce oxygen which we need to breathe and keep the air clean.
  • Trees give shade in the summer and keep us cool.
  • Trees are also used to build homes.
  • Trees are used for making paper and medicines.

What are the parts of a tree?

  • Trunk—the stem and the part that is wood.
  • Bark—the “skin” of the tree that helps protect it.
  • Roots—the “straws” that the tree uses to take in water from the dirt.
  • Leaves—use the water and sunlight to make food for the tree.
  • Branches—take water to the leaves and hold the leaves.
  • Fruit—some trees have fruits we can eat.
  • Blossoms—the flowers that bloom and later become fruit.

Activity:  Leaf Rubbings

  • Collect leaves of all shapes and sizes as you explore the trees outside.
  • Position leaves vein side up.
  • Lay a sheet of plain white paper over the top of the leaves.
  • Turn a crayon on its side and gently rub over the paper.

The leaf images will magically appear on the paper!

For more educational products and information visit www.phonicsbyspelling.com

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